Naace

Press Release - Decoding Learning

Author: Jan Webb
With Nesta publishing the Decoding Learning report on 16 November 2012, prepared by respected academics from London's Institute of Education and Nottingham's Learning Sciences Research Institute, a huge debate has already begun into digital division, preparedness, professional development - and much more. A range of articles in the media have referred to schools wasting their investments in technology and have failed to recognise some of the truly remarkable work that is going on in schools - many examples of which are shared in the Decoding Report and by our own Third Millennium schools. Check out our interview below with Rose Luckin, one of the report's authors and watch out for continuing discussions shared via Naace.

Technology massively improves learning - but only in some schools

A Naace Response to Decoding Learning

 

Naace warmly welcomes the NESTA report, "Decoding Education..." which confirms and develops the experience of the Naace membership.  The basis in research findings, and the methodology used to integrate those findings, strongly substantiates the conclusions the report draws. Naace particularly welcomes the focus on learning, and believes the learning taxonomy used is especially useful.  Mark Chambers, Naace Chief Executive, said "The report will be essential reading for all schools and policymakers, both nationally and internationally".

 

The report highlights the fact that schools are not getting the full benefit from the technology they purchase, though Naace experience shows that, in many cases technology has a clear impact. This is clear from the submissions that schools have made to the Naace 3rd Millennium Learning Award, which has been awarded to 100 schools, and from the self-reviews of over 1000 schools gaining the ICT Mark.  However, as the Sutton Trust report earlier this year highlighted, wide variations exist and there are schools investing in technology without a clear vision of what/how their pupils should learn and how technology can facilitate this. At a time of massive worldwide change because of technology, equipping ALL learners to understand and participate effectively in a digital society, is an issue of major concern to parents and those concerned with the UK’s global competitiveness. 

 

Mark Chambers, Chief Executive of Naace, speaking in response to the publication of the Nesta report “Decoding Learning”, reinforced the report’s message that, it’s the way that technology is being used that is important and professional development plays an important role in this. "Schools that are achieving the full impact of technology and raising pupils' energy in their learning are showing the way for others. This is within reach of all schools if the school leaders ensure that their teachers explore what is being achieved by leading schools, such as those, in working with Naace and achieving recognition for their technology use. There should be a much stronger national focus on how schools can make best use of technology, as access by pupils to computers and the Internet is unstoppable and deeply embedded in their experience beyond school," said Mark.

 

The Naace experience is that almost invariably, good and better schools make good and better use of digital technologies to improve learner outcomes, as evidenced by our 1000 ICT Mark and 100 3rd Millennium Learning Award schools, and where this does not happen the pupil experience may be impoverished.  This leads to a pedagogical digital divide, and two types of school; those where learning is broad, rich and improved through the effective use of digital technology and those where it is not.  The report is useful in its use of aggregated expert opinion to judge the usefulness of innovations and compare them, though it doesn’t provide guidance to further action.  The report itself contains many inviting accounts of worthwhile activities, rather than stating explicit criteria for the value of an innovation; Naace supports schools who need further guidance when deciding what a useful innovation might be for them, and how to put it into place. 

 

Naace believes we need to support and encourage schools to take rigorous approaches to developing a broad and balanced ICT curriculum and to using technology as a transforming tool within the wider curriculum.  We work with schools and teachers in a range of professional development opportunities to support this.  For example, the Naace TOTAL programme for school leaders provides a general approach to the evaluation of learning supported by digital technologies, through a more sophisticated understanding of cost, benefit and quantifying impact on learning. Schools also need the means to determine more accurately the point of impact of an innovation, and measure it.  Naace is working closely with partners to construct tools to help schools do this.

 

As the national association for ICT, our organisation brings together industry, researchers, teachers and schools to work closely together and learn from each other – partnerships and networking that are advocated in the report.  It is such partnerships that are important if we are to achieve our goal of empowering learners to be the society of the future.

 

Click here for the Naace Interview with Professor Rose Luckin

Press Release - Decoding Learning
With Nesta publishing the Decoding Learning report on 16 November 2012, prepared by respected academics from London's Institute of Education and Nottingham's Learning Sciences Research Institute, a huge debate has already begun into digital division, preparedness, professional development - and much more. A range of articles in the media have referred to schools wasting their investments in technology and have failed to recognise some of the truly remarkable work that is going on in schools - many examples of which are shared in the Decoding Report and by our own Third Millennium schools. Check out our interview below with Rose Luckin, one of the report's authors and watch out for continuing discussions shared via Naace.