Naace

Standards Library

Author: Lyndsey Reed
Assessing and Reporting Progress in Computing Without Levels

From 1 September 2014 the subject of “ICT” will be renamed “Computing” and it will have a new Programme of Study to outline the skills children should acquire at Key Stages 1-4. Whilst the requirement to assess and report on children’s progress and attainment will remain, the framework of National Curriculum Levels as a device for doing so will not. Some schools welcome the move away from levelling work (and thus labelling children), while others are more hesitant; there are equally strong arguments for doing away with levels as for keeping them. Either way, schools need to decide how their teachers will report meaningfully on their pupils’ progress. Following on from that, how will standards be compared nationally? Does the removal of Levels signal the end of league tables? How will schools know whether their pupils are achieving and progressing at an appropriate rate? How will schools know whether their pupils’ needs are being met?

Naace knows through consultation that hundreds of schools in England – and overseas – are asking exactly these questions; in response, Naace has developed a Standards Library for Computing, that is, an online repository of moderated children’s work. The intention is that this will match the performance of pupils against specific aspects of the Computing PoS at a given age; be structured so that teachers can find appropriate exemplars quickly and easily; and will set a national minimum expectation for attainment for all year groups from Year 1 to Year 9. The Library will classify pupils’ work by age and PoS topic, which will enable teachers to check whether their pupils’ attainment in a particular area, for example use of video, is appropriate for their age; compare their school’s standards with other schools; and find a growing range of crowd sourced examples of standardised pupil work.

 

Having used the Standards Library to assess children’s work, it can then help to inform suitable next steps for learning that will scaffold children’s journeys towards the end of key stage attainment statements given in the PoS. By this means, teachers will also be able to share effectively cross-curricular ideas for embedding children’s skills through creating digital projects in other subject areas.

 

In order to populate the Library, Naace needs examples of children’s work, and welcomes contributions from interested schools. All work in the Library will be tagged by age, and referenced to the NC Programmes of Study – which need not be restricted to Computing. For example, videos demonstrating Digital Literacy at a particular age might be in the context of science, English, or humanities subjects. In the fullness of time, this aspect has potential to become “phase 2” of Naace’s Standards Library – a multi-subject resource that establishes norms for competence-based coursework assessments able to facilitate direct comparison of work within and between schools.

 

For the time being though, Naace needs your help. Do you feel able to contribute you pupils’ work to the Standards Library for Computing? Pupils will of course be anonymous, and schools have the option of anonymity if they wish.  A brief description of the nature of the task is needed, along with the child’s age and level of support needed/given to complete the task. Simply download the form below, and when completed return it, along with the child’s work, to claire.lloyd@naace.co.uk.  We really appreciate your help and would like to encourage you to engage with this new resource which we believe will benefit the whole Naace community.

Standards Library
Assessing and Reporting Progress in Computing Without Levels

From 1 September 2014 the subject of “ICT” will be renamed “Computing” and it will have a new Programme of Study to outline the skills children should acquire at Key Stages 1-4. Whilst the requirement to assess and report on children’s progress and attainment will remain, the framework of National Curriculum Levels as a device for doing so will not. Some schools welcome the move away from levelling work (and thus labelling children), while others are more hesitant; there are equally strong arguments for doing away with levels as for keeping them. Either way, schools need to decide how their teachers will report meaningfully on their pupils’ progress. Following on from that, how will standards be compared nationally? Does the removal of Levels signal the end of league tables? How will schools know whether their pupils are achieving and progressing at an appropriate rate? How will schools know whether their pupils’ needs are being met?